Tag Archives: QLD Writers Centre

National Science Week Ginko: Sunday August 11

As part of National Science Week, the good people at QLD Writers Centre have asked me to host a ginko and haiku workshop on Sunday August 11. Science and haiku… it’s the perfect partnership, as writing haiku is all about activating the senses to inform your poetic voice.

Here are the full details of the event and how to book a spot:

Date: Sunday August 11
Time: 10:30am – 4:30pm
Venue: QWC Offices, Level 2, State Library of Queensland, Cultural Centre, Stanley Place, South Brisbane
Price: Full Price – $160, Concession – $144, QWC Members – $110, QWC Member Concessions – $99 Book Online here or call 3842 9922

And it wouldn’t feel right if I didn’t leave you with a haiku…

 cockatooburst

fire season
a blue gum explodes
with cockatoos

2 Comments

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry

Going Indie: Inside Self Publishing

Next Saturday, September 22 from 11am – 1pm, I will be teaming up with industry professionals, Sally Collings and Alan Baxter as part of the panel for the QLD Writers Centre seminar, Going Indie: Inside Self-Publishing. Between the three of us we will aim to demystify the world of self-publishing by addressing critical topics such as, editing and manuscript development, marketing and author platforms and making and selling books.

As many of you would know, I took the passionate leap into self-publishing some 6 years ago and have never looked back. So, if you are in, or around Brisbane, come along and get a rare insider’s view of the world of self-publishing (it’s rewards and challenges!).

Places in the seminar are limited and can be booked online at QWC.

Here’s a little information about Sally and Alan, who join me on the panel:

Sally Collings is an internationally successful book publisher and bestselling author. She offers a 360-degree view of how books get written and published, as well as what makes a bestseller fly off the bookstore shelves. Sally is the author of Sophie’s Journey, Positive, The World According to Kids and Parenting with Soul.

Alan Baxter is a British-Australian author living on the south coast of NSW, Australia. He writes dark fantasy, science fiction and horror, rides a motorcycle and loves his dog. He also teaches Kung Fu. Read extracts from his novels, a novella, and short stories at his website www.alanbaxteronline.com – and feel free to tell him what you think. About anything.

[If you have any questions about the course or your suitability for this seminar please phone QWC on 3842 9922 or email us at qldwriters@qwc.asn.au prior to booking.]

1 Comment

Filed under events & opportunities

February Pin-Up Week #4: Ross Donlon Catches Poems

February has but a handful of days left, which means Summer is also all but gone… It is also time to say goodbye to our February Pin-Up Poet, Ross Donlon, but never fear, he will be hear in Brisbane before the month is out performing at Riverbend Books and SpeedPoets. And he is also running a workshop while he is in town, which is what we got to talking about this week.

**********

I wanted to ask about the workshop you are running in Brisbane titled ‘Catching Poems’. What can participants expect to come away with at the end of the day?

Yes, I’ve begun to call my workshops ‘Catching Poems’ picking up on what someone said – I forget who, ‘The world is full of poems. They just need an edit.’  The class will be writing poems to begin and reading poems aloud in the last session.

I have a couple of mantras I put on the board and one is by Frank O’Hara : ‘Follow Your Nerve’.

So the aim is to have the class come away with a number of drafts from short bursts of intensive writing following some ideas and stimulus and models I supply. Ideally there will be ‘useful lines’ or ‘useful passages’, even a ‘useful phrase’, they they can then take home and build into a finished poem from the exercises.

It is not a class where poets will be pondering and mulling for an extended period of time and chatting with me. Others are put off or lose concentration with that muttering, I think. I do ‘go around the class’ and invite poets to read their ‘best bit’ be it a  phrase, or line, or sentence or pasage – more as the class develops and poets become more relaxed. So, if the class goes away with, say 6 ‘useful bits’ in 6 different kinds of poems to work – that’s what I’m after.

I was at the last launch of a major Australian literary journal. There were six readers, including me, but an observer present said that only three of us could be understood. The rest were too fast and  / or indistinct because they were too far from the mike. Diction is helped if the pace is right. So I think this is a useful skill to learn whether for reading poetry – or at your wedding!

So in the last session we will do microphone  technique and reading for an audience where each person reads a poem they have chosen (not their own)  using the mike. I will model what I do, then  it’s likely each poet will go through their poem a couple of times with me offering some advice.

In sum, I hope the class will take away: some useful drafts / some new poems and names to follow up / some ideas about reading technique.

I’m also happy to do a Q and A if there’s time about my experiences as regards publishing or reading or anything else about writing and reading poetry.

There are still places left in the workshop, so for those lucky enough to be able to attend, here are the details:

Catching Poems w/ Ross Donlon

Join award-winning Victorian poet Ross Donlon for an all-day session, giving poets ideas to catch and edit poems as well as tips and practice on how to read for public performance. This is a hands-on workshop using both formal and more open structures, so poets can expect to take away a number of drafts. There will be time for writing and sharing. The afternoon session will also include tips on mic use and public performance techniques with flexibility for other interests which may arise from the early session.

Ross is published in both newspapers and academic journals and has read at festivals both in Australia and England. He has won prizes both for the written and spoken word, including the Launceston Cup, premier spoken word event of the Tasmanian Poetry Festival and the Wenlock Festival Poetry Prize (U.K.) judged by Carol Ann Duffy, English Poet Laureate. His latest book, The Blue Dressing Gown and other poems, is published by Profile Poetry.

When: Sunday 4th March 2012
Time: 10am – 3pm
Where: Room 1.A, State Library of Queensland
Cost: $65

Please contact sarah.qldpoetry@gmail.com for further information or to enrol in the workshop.

**********

At Haberfield Demonstration School

I was with the boys in our group
at the meeting place, a peppercorn tree,
eating lunch inside the shadow.
The peppercorns’ bright, spicy scent
remains in memory
the way it stays on fingers with the stain.

Soon I would be ready for the Big School.
Boys were separated from the girls’
asphalt playground of rectangles, circles and squares.
Boys played wars up
and down a sloping paddock beyond the classrooms.
We heard the cries a continent away.

Suddenly the talk came to fathers and what they did.
As turns edged around the circle like a clock
I discovered that I could not speak.
What was it that could I not say?

The bell saved me as I was falling.
A huge part of who I thought I was
had avalanched, as if a shelf dropped
from a mountain.

I was an obedient child
but I ran home from school then to Nan,
my family skittled by a missing pin.

We sat on her bed and looked at photographs
and a face the size of a fingernail.
Bill. From the war.
She fanned out pictures like playing cards.

It was a summer’s day.
The bedroom’s lace curtains glowed in the heat.
Wind blew sweet scent from Peek Frean’s biscuit factory.
The bitumen noise of cars rushed down our street.

2 Comments

Filed under poetry & publishing

February Pin-Up Week #3: Ross Donlon on the art of reading

February is racing along and the Brisbane Poetry Scene is set to explode with a number of gigs over the coming weeks. One of the featured readers at said gigs is our February Pin-Up Poet, Ross Donlon, so this week, I asked Ross about the art of reading.

**********

On your first visit to the Tasmanian Poetry Festival, you took out the coveted Tasmanian Poetry Cup which is awarded to the poet who receives the loudest audience response. I have had the pleasure of seeing you read on a handful of occasions and you always seem to be incredibly ‘present’ in your work. What is it you love about being in front of an audience and what kind of experience do you hope to create for them?

I was thrilled to win the Launceston Cup, only the second mainliner (if you’ll pardon the joke) to do so at that time – Lauren Williams, a poet I greatly admire, was the other. I enjoy the reading experience, especially, of course, if you get a sense of connection with an audience. I have read to nobody at all – and did read (seriously – in Shepparton), with 5  other poets reading to an audience of 2 (Ceduna) – as well as larger crowds. Once I sold 6 books to an audience of 4, so I was very pleased about that. I’ve come a long way from the man aged 25 who couldn’t speak at his own wedding for shyness. Of course, sometimes the chemistry is all there on both sides, sometimes not quite. Festival crowds are generous I’ve found. Sometimes the small inner sanctum type audience is harder to reach.

I came to teaching eventually, which was the key for me – facing classes of Year 9s makes you find things in yourself – I found that part of my thing was to sometimes ‘play’ with the audience/class in that show teachers do – and I did some lectures for Yr 12 texts, taught professional writing at Deakin and Melbourne unis, so all of that helped.

Frankly, I do like to entertain at a reading, meaning I do like to throw a lighter or humorous (we hope) poem into the mix. It seems to me that a more thoughtful or discursive poem has a chance of being heard more if you’ve just made people laugh – and I’m on about the total experience of being human, so some light in the dark – and I like to display range of form and content. I’m an emotional poet but interested in social commentary (Geoff Page described me in a review as ‘Swiftian’ – I loved that).

I am not an intellectual poet but I want to be understood without sacrificing craft.

I like to give an audience a good time but push them emotionally or share an experience in a new or fresh way, if that makes any sense.

**********

Ross will feature at both SpeedPoets and the first Riverbend Books Reading for 2012. Here are the details for Riverbend, and believe me, this is an event that regularly sells out, so make sure you book your ticket soon!

Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the first event in the Riverbend Poetry Series for 2012. The February event features local poetic powerhouse, Samuel Wagan Watson and winner of the 2011 Val Vallis Award, Rachael Briggs alongside vibrant Central QLD poet, Kristin Hannaford and recent winner of the Wenlock Festival Poetry Prize (UK), Ross Donlon (VIC).

The Riverbend Poetry Series is one of the state’s finest, so be there to get the 2012 readings off to a flying start!

Date: Tuesday February 28
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10
Bookings: Online or call the store on (o7) 3899 8555

**********

And since it was Valentine’s Day this week, I will leave you with one of Ross’s love poems. The simmering, with her.

with her

and at last she comes to bed
the blue nightie
caught below her knees
and as she bends -  like a girl picking flowers -
her breast moves with the movement down
her hair falls to one side

there’s a scent of rose and jasmine
and her nightcream glows
as she switches off the light
and climbs towards me
while I wait in my singlet and skin
with a useless book and glasses

nearly sixty
yet we slide beneath the sheet
like children slipping beneath the first wave of summer
and it’s she who turns  first
to fold her hair before it’s caught
as I turn to hold her
my palm floating across her back
pausing then stroking again – like soothing  something young and wild
shifting her thigh across mine
kissing her lips like a kiss before sleep
when it’s really hello how are you tonight?
as she sighs and says
this is nice
and our bodies move together
like an answer

5 Comments

Filed under Pin Ups

Poetry Picks of 2011: Sarah Gory

With the year swerving to an end, it’s time to have a look back at some of the most exciting poetry collections released in 2011. First up, I have asked QLD Poetry Festival Director, Sarah Gory, to share her pick of the year:

Remember wild nights out ‘til dawn where the freedom was so palpable it was more than recklessness – you actually were invincible? Or the sheer glee of playing in the back garden with the skipping-rope water hose in the heat of summer?

Michelle Dicinoski’s first collection, Electricity for Beginners, captures with absolute clarity the intensity of feeling wrapped up in moments and memories such as these. A motley assortment of poems about love, about stealing grass, hanging prayer flags, riding bikes up hills, children in shopping trolleys, listening to frogs in floodwaters.

The clarity and ease of expression in each poem makes the collection accessible, almost familiar. The language is fresh, but never clichéd or tired. It is full of snapshot images that are quintessentially Brisbane – late summer storms, tongue and groove houses, yellow cabs, eucalyptus sap. Yet the sharp breath of emotion evoked in these vignettes is not bound by geography. The sentiment is universal.

My favourite piece in the collection is Such Riches, an ode to the beauty of details, a reminder that our riches are living entities, that they are already our own:

“If anyone should ask, tell them / bluebottles, cuttlefish, sea glass / and wild raspberries that charge / blood for fruit. Tell them / drunk on ten dollars and kissing the dawn.”

Above all, the poems in Electricity for Beginners are both intimate and soaring, a reminder of why small moments leave indelible memories. The strength of the collection is that it inhabits the everyday in a way that is far from mundane. Through Michelle’s eye, even a driving lesson becomes transcendental:

“Every time I find that point, he fills / me with joy as he says / deadpan: Now give her some exhilaration. / And up, up, up she goes.”

Electricity for Beginners is published by Clouds of Magellan (2011) and can be purchased directly through their website.

********************

Sarah Gory is a reader, writer, and cultural producer. She is Manager of the Queensland Poetry Festival and Acting Programs & Services Manager at the Queensland Writers Centre. Prior to moving to Brisbane she was Manager of the National Young Writers Festival and worked at Oxfam Australia. You can find a random collection of her thoughts and photos at unworkability. The language is fresh, but never clichéd or tired.

6 Comments

Filed under discussions, poetry & publishing

Help Make A Difference: Raising funds for a High School Poetry Project

I have spoken at length on many occasions about the state of poetry in schools (most notably this article: The Death of Poetry in Australian Classrooms), so each year, I make it my business to ensure I offer workshops to teachers and students where I can, to help bring a love of poetry back to the classroom.  But one person can only do so much… that’s where you come in.

As part of his recent residency, 2011 Arts QLD Poet-in-Residence, Jacob Polley, collaboratively wrote a stunning long poem, titled Daily Rituals, Vernacular River: A Telegraphing of Brisbane, with four students from the QLD Academy of Creative Industries (QACI). The poem is elegantly designed and printed on fold out card, to simultaneously represent the flow of the river and the rise of the city; five voices melding together to bring us snapshots of a day in Brisbane’s history and the lives of the poets.

The Story Bridge is open like a book
that tells a tale about the city’s people
from point to Valley, bank to bank, across
the river’s jagged mouth. One must begin
the journey down between the flow of words
Vernacular rivers are spoken, unconfined.

The poem, Daily Rituals, Vernacular River, is a fine reminder of what can be achieved when poetry is skillfully introduced into the classroom; of the thrill and passion that poetry can produce in us all. So to help make a difference, Jacob came up with the idea of establishing a Poetry Competition for High School students in 2012. The competition will be administered by Queensland Poetry Festival, and judged by Jacob and a prominent Australian poet.  QLD Poetry Festival also plans to send poets out into schools to run workshops and give readings, to generate some real excitement and give the project authenticity. But as you know, all of this requires funds…

Here’s how you can help:

A copy of Daily Rituals, Vernacular River can be yours for just $5. The full amount of every purchase will go towards establishing the Competition. The goal is to raise enough funds to offer first, second, and third place cash prizes, as well as run poetry workshops for high school students across the state. As an added bonus, Queensland Writers Centre has generously pledged to match the total amount of money raised.

To pick up a copy of the poem and to help make a difference, visit www.queenslandpoetryfestival.com, click on the Paypal button on the home page, and away you go. If you don’t have paypal and still want to contribute, just send an email to Sarah Gory at qldpoetry@gmail.com with ‘DAILY RITUALS’ in the subject heading, and she’ll get back to you to arrange a suitable method of payment. 

And never one to shy away from helping out, I am also getting on board to give this project a push and raise these much needed funds. Each year I publish Brisbane New Voices as a way of showcasing some of the fine talent emerging from this great city. I have 20 copies of this gorgeous publication available at $12 each, and I plan to donate 100% of all sales to establishing this exciting High School Poetry Competition in 2012.

To get yourself a copy email me at geenunn(at)yahoo(dot)com(dot)au with the subject ‘High School Poetry Project’ and we can arrange payment from there.

You can also help by spreading the word wide and far… facebook it, tweet it, blog it, email it, shout it from your kitchen window! The wider the word spreads, the better.

Join with me… together, we can make a difference!

7 Comments

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry & publishing

Riverbend Poetry Series II – Julie Beveridge

Just two more sleeps until the deck of Riverbend Books lights up with the words of local poetic shape-shifter David ‘Ghostboy’ Stavanger; new voice, Vanessa Page; the award winning Max Ryan and Brisbane lady of words, Julie Beveridge.

Julie is an emerging poet. She is the Program and Services Manager for Queensland Writers Centre and was Festival Director for the Queensland Poetry Festival in 2008 and 2009. Julie is an active member of the Brisbane poetry community and is passionate about innovation in the promotion and distribution of new work to audiences. Julie has been a feature artist at the Queensland Poetry Festival: spoken in one strange word; Byron Bay Writers Festival; Brisbane Writers Festival; Tasmanian Poetry Festival and the Sydney Writers Festival: 2006 Word Wrestling Federation SLAM as well as reading at various arts events throughout Queensland, Melbourne and Vancouver. Her latest collection, Home is where the Heartache is (Small Change Press), is her first collection of haibun. As she has been promising for several years now, her follow up collection home{sic} is still under development.

Here’s a recent poem:

by way of explanation– a letter to my former self

i

in that pivotal moment
overcome by language

longing    surrender   fatality

all too vast to even whisper

vast

like ocean liners appearing in a landscape
distant and unassuming
evolved from nautical miniatures
into colossal water vessels that
carry the wealthy and retired
who secretly hate to travel
but who live like sharks
swimming
swimming

ii

words
fused to the walls of my memory
rocks weight the pockets of suicidal expectations as the water rises

suddenly I cannot describe the soft white flesh of the ripe green pear

iii

the precise moment I can’t exactly pinpoint
cannot articulate the second when the
thought of a poem became infinite
cannot recall the shift of sky (though probably grey)
or the correct mass of expectation
i have placed upon myself (though probably heavy
to the point where you need a hand
outstretched kindly
to help you lift it)
can probably recall my husband
quiet supportive and over achieved
facing me with the simplicity of a man waiting at an open door
with tea in one hand and toast in the other
though he may not have been physically present

iv

consumed with the figure of myself
that i thought had been painted on my behalf
by some gorgeous designer who wears
off shade single breasted suit jackets
to hide his gentle breast line
but that was really self drawn and
unflatteringly inaccurate

v

later in the bathroom
a wet moth takes solace
in the cool ice white tile
before getting sucked
into the exhaust fan

so swiftly
not even the moth
it turns out
knew it was turning
to dust

If you haven’t already got yourself a ticket, here’s all the details:

Date: Tuesday 19 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/2491/Riverbend+Poetry+Series

Hope to see you all there,

2 Comments

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry & publishing

Riverbend Poetry Series II – Max Ryan

It’s only a week away until the second event in the Rivernbend Poetry Series is here, so if you haven’t got your tickets, check the details below and make sure you snap one up. This is a poetry line up that is bound to light up the deck – Vanessa Page, David Stavanger, Julie Beveridge & from just across the border, award winning poet, Max Ryan.

Max Ryan’s collaborative CD with musician Cleis Pearce has received several music industry awards. He has twice won the Byron Bay Writers’ Festival Poetry Prize and been short-listed for the Newcastle Poetry Prize. His  first book Rainswayed Night won the 2005 Anne Elder Award. His latest collection Before the Sky won the Picaro Press Poetry Prize.

His words sift deep into life and are full of power and insight.
                                                                                      – Judith Beveridge

Here’s a recent poem from Max:

 

krishna

leaps out from behind a tin awning everywhere I look baba I no find you

he says stealing me a sweet from a vendor’s barrow here baba all thing

shine together as I follow his stop-start shuffle down kolkata alleyways

out to chaplin square where a wedding band oomphas round the corner

and a stray dancer twirls on dusty sandals and laughs into the hazy air

laughs till a beggar takes my arm whispering long life too much money

in three week many thanks ten rupee holding me by the arm hissing his

mad mantra all the way down to chor bazaar closed now except for the

lights of a chai stall where a man with a trolley for legs rolls out from

under a table and points to where krishna sits against a wall come come

krishna calls this ground my home baba this my mother krishna one day

shining in saffron robes saddhu beard and trident next day rough-shaven

a tilted fez hawaiian beach shirt and trousers krishna face swollen blue

from one more police bashing come come baba you want charas very

cheap come come very best I find you krishna leading me through smoke

of evening coal fires along to mirza ghalib street where two young

ecstatics sit cross-legged on a blanket wailing to the dim city sky willing

their bodies away from this world of men made of straw bismillah they

sing may the lord deliver us tonight bismillah take us into his final sweet

flame do not trust this krishna a washed-up sailor tells me through the

mist of his steaming chai do not trust this man

 

Full details of the event are:

Tuesday April 19
 
Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second event in the Riverbend Poetry Series for 2011. The April event features one of Brisbane’s finest new voices, Vanessa Page, reading from her debut collection, Memory Bone, the wildly wonderful, David Stavanger (And the Ringmaster Said), lover of all things rock’n’roll, Julie Beveridge (Home is Where the Heartache is) and Max Ryan, who’s latest collection Before the Sky won the inaugural Picaro Poetry Prize. 
 
Date: Tuesday 19 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/2491/Riverbend+Poetry+Series

Get your tickets this week!

1 Comment

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry & publishing

Riverbend Poetry Series II: David Stavanger

April is here and in just over two weeks, the second event in the 2011 Riverbend Poetry Series will light up the Riverbend Deck. One of the features on the night is one of Brisbane’s most dynamic performers, David ‘Ghostboy’ Stavanger.

David Stavanger – and his bent alter ego Ghostboy – are the Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde of Australian poetry. These two artists in the one skin have become known for their distinct work on both the page and the stage, with pieces published in The Courier Mail, Blue Dog, Cordite, Going Down Swinging, and The Spoken Word Revolution: Redux (USA, 2nd Ed) as well as performing work live on ABC & Triple J radio. Their first book & CD Station to Station was released in 2006.  David’s first solo book, And the Ringmaster Said… was released to good reviews through Small Change Press (2008), the independent South-East QLD imprint he co-started in 2006 with poet Graham Nunn. A live hybrid of performance poetry, spoken weird theatre & surrealist soundscapes they have both been a feature at many major festivals including Brisbane Writers, Sydney Writers, Byron Bay Writers, Tasmanian Poetry, Broken Hill Poetry, Woodford Folk Festival, and QLD Poetry Festivals as well as featuring as part of NightWords at the Sydney Opera House.  David is fresh back from a spoken word/poetry tour of the US, funded by Arts QLD. You can check out more of his work at www.myspace.com/davidstavanger

If you have had the live David/Ghostboy experience, then you are in for something out of the box. Here’s a recent poem:

Sleep, hit me (a response to Blue Velvet)

a.

first key opens the door. this
key unlocks the night. when
you enter, the room, it has no
corners. her voice falls down
the hall. lock up the tears.
young water breaks here.

there is a black scar across my blue heart

b.

on Lincoln, we shot the breeze
under winter trees. in these woods
I tried to be frank, we curious cats,
your skirt sang like a fire engine.
open enough boxes, you soon discover
the siren behind every door.

kiss me. don’t kiss me. kiss me.

c.

stay in the car. stay hard to the
wheel. wait for my call. don’t
answer the phone. hit the horn.
never brake. matches lit burn.

she watches him leap the stairs
like a man on fire. her desire to
not find answers is lost before
the sandman gathers the creases.
sleep, hit me.

in dreams we are not together / we are not alone

d.

on Lt Williams desk are two phones,
police radios knife the air. he can’t tell
you where this is heading but he can tell
you when it will start. “you can call her
pretty” he says “cause’ pretty girl graves
aren’t deep”. fat chance dances on a rooftop.

when Frank arrives he never comes.
he is leather, he is the fucker, he is love.
some people wear masks to surprise
the senses, others don’t wear fear at all.
he smells of well heeled jacks at the spring ball.

the teeth aren’t the problem / he will cut you with his eyes

 

Full details of the event are:

Tuesday April 19
 
Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second event in the Riverbend Poetry Series for 2011. The April event features one of Brisbane’s finest new voices, Vanessa Page, reading from her debut collection, Memory Bone, the wildly wonderful, David Stavanger (And the Ringmaster Said), lover of all things rock’n’roll, Julie Beveridge (Home is Where the Heartache is) and Max Ryan, who’s latest collection Before the Sky won the inaugural Picaro Poetry Prize. 
 
Date: Tuesday 19 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/2491/Riverbend+Poetry+Series

These events are always hugely popular, so book early to avoid disappointment!

1 Comment

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry & publishing

Riverbend Poetry Series II: Vanessa Page

The second event in the Riverbend Poetry Series is edging closer and it is another stellar line up of poets that will light up the Riverbend Deck on Tuesday April 19. Taking the stage on the night will be David ‘Ghostboy’ Stavanger, Julie Beveridge, Max Ryan and emerging Brisbane poet, Vanessa Page.

Vanessa Page is a Rosewood-based poet who hails from Toowoomba in Queensland. Memory Bone is her first collection of poetry and is due to be published in 2011 by PressPress

Vanessa is a frequent reader at Brisbane’s SpeedPoets events and has been a feature poet at 2010’s Poetry Author Month readings at Avid Reader bookstore in West End.

Her work has been published at kipple, the bluepepper, SpeedPoets zine and in the 2010 Central Coast Poets Inc Anthology. She won the USQ Poetry Prize in 2010 and in 2009 was runner up at the Ipswich International Poetry Feast.

Vanessa will be reading from Memory Bone on the night, so if you are yet to have the pleasure here is a poem by Vanessa to introduce you to her words.

Christmas, 1982

We are kiss curls wet under
paper crowns, sun licked noses over
seersucker cloth, and milk teeth
nibbling corners off white Christmas

Skin poached by December and
hands burnt blue in the mouths of
concrete laundry tubs, fishing
for the last creaming soda 

In bullet heat, the fig tree is
a tangle of arms and legs and
skinny tinsel is threaded loose
through may bush spindles
 
We are barefoot over bindii eyes,
blurs melted into photo paper
squares, lips smiling over icy pole
slicks and fossilised in tangerine

We carve our initials deep into
asbestos cement off-cuts for
safekeeping, and bury them with
memories under the mulberry tree.

                        **********

Full details of the event are:

Tuesday April 19
 
Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the second event in the Riverbend Poetry Series for 2011. The April event features one of Brisbane’s finest new voices, Vanessa Page, reading from her debut collection, Memory Bone, the wildly wonderful, David Stavanger (And the Ringmaster Said), lover of all things rock’n’roll, Julie Beveridge (Home is Where the Heartache is) and Max Ryan, who’s latest collection Before the Night won the inaugural Picaro Poetry Prize. 
 
Date: Tuesday 19 April
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at http://www.riverbendbooks.com.au/Events/2491/Riverbend+Poetry+Series

These events are always hugely popular, so book early to avoid disappointment!

6 Comments

Filed under events & opportunities, poetry & publishing