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The Next Big Thing(s) – Vanessa Page & Nigel Ellis

2013 has some exciting releases about to drop, two of which, are the debut, full-length collections from Vanessa Page and Nigel Ellis.

Vanessa-Page

Vanessa released the micro-collection, Feeding Paper Tigers last year as part of Brisbane New Voices III and will follow this up with the launch of her collection, Confessional Box (Walleah Press) in February this year.

You can read all of Vanessa’s responses to The Next Big Thing interview on her blog, but here’s a preview to send you on your way…

What is the title of your book?

Confessional Box

What genre does your book fall under?

Poetry

What is the one sentence synopsis of your book?

I’d say poems about love, loss and hope in domestic and Queensland-based settings. But my friends Brett Dionysius and Graham Nunn say this a little more eloquently:

“Confessional Box maps the undulating landscapes of home, love and letting go. Page’s poems are sensuous, compassionate and filled with quiet wisdom; they are a celebration of the world’s infinite gifts.” – Graham Nunn

“Page’s poems are growth rings in the tree of human experience. Like the embodied moment, these are poems to run your hands over and remember how they felt. Page’s sensual poems are a fine addition to the contemporary Australian lyric.” — B. R. Dionysius

*****

Nigel has been an essential part of the Brisbane poetry community for many years, so this is a release I have been anticipating for sometime.

Nigel Ellis

Nigel also responded to The Next Big Thing interview and this is what he had to say:

What is the title of your book?

Hæmatograms

What genre does your book fall under?

Poetry

What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

It’s a work of reportage – an exploration of the surging currents & deadly undertows of intimate relationships, peppered with attempts to understand, delineate, & in some ways even construct a self

Where did the idea come from for the book?

The very lovely very brave Dale Winslow of Neopoiesis Press suggested that i publish a collection, & encouraged me to overcome my big-match nerves.

How long did it take you to write the first draft of the manuscript?

The book is a collection of around 45 poems from the last 5 or more years.  The tricky part was choosing works to include that would enable the creation of some kind of loose narrative thread, or threads.  It was roughly two years from initial discussions to finished product.

Who or what inspired you to write this book?

Recent years have brought all kinds of profound shifts, reversals, advances, & so on, in my personal circumstances.   The constant but largely subconscious process of constructing & maintaining interpersonal relationships & self-identity that we all perform as, in whatever ways, we narrate our own lives, has been thrown into sharp focus for me.  The primacy of languages, and how we may and do use them, inspires my every word-choice.

Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

The book is published by the US-based Neopoiesis Press; a young & vibrant independent publisher.  A few years ago, some poems of mine were included in the anthology that was their first-ever publication.  Although they’re very small, It’s great to be able to hook into their network and resources.

What other works would you compare this book to within your genre?

I’m letting this one through to the keeper.

What actors would you choose to play the part of your characters in a movie rendition?

Sheesh!
uUMmmm…  Harold Lloyd?  The entire cast of Fantastic Voyage?

What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

As far as I can tell, my coinage of the word ‘hæmatogram’ (writing in/with blood) is, outside of obscure medical terminology, original & so far, unique.

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water bucket
carrying the weight
of my reflection

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June Pin-Up Poet Week #2: Julie Beveridge on Vancouver & San Francisco

This week, Julie and I continue our discussion about the concept of home and how travel can reveal some unlikely ones…

Over to you Jules,

*****

ALS: San Francisco and Vancouver are places that provide a home for you / the poet in home{sic}. What is it about those places that provided the space to call them home?

Having travelled to Vancouver a couple of times – when I went there last year (with you, remember?) it felt as though I was travelling home after a time away. The landmarks, spaces, the way the city moves all more familiar. A dear friend put us up and we came ‘home’ every night.

It was my second time to San Francisco too, after travelling there with my family as a young girl. The city came to me completely unfamiliar, though every now and then I would have a geographical memory  … I would find myself on the corner of something and somewhere street and just know how to get somewhere else (being six months pregnant this was usually around the need to go to the bathroom). Memory slides would flick over in my head of me as a nine year old being toured around the city by my father to all the tourist destinations.

When I travel I like to become a local and I soon found San Francisco had a pattern to it. Grant Street. Market Street. City Lights Bookstore. Vesuvios. North Beach. The Mission. A daily trek around these places became the routine. City Lights especially felt like home, having pregnant lady naps in Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s rocking chair most days while my husband (that’s you sharky!) methodically thumbed through every book on the shelf. China Town was our home. Sleeping thick in the belly of the beast and waking up each morning to the same beautiful Chinese women handing out the same beautiful menus.

Having said that, I struggled with San Francisco much like I struggle with Tasmania. I loved it, quite passionately, but don’t think I could ever actually live there. It’s a strange feeling to articulate.

Also, travelling pregnant, had a turtle like feel to it… not just because I looked like one. Our little family moved around together so effortlessly. We could be anywhere together and it would be home.

*****

Julie launches home{sic} at Riverbend Books on Tuesday June 19. Doors for the event open at 6pm with the event starting at 6:30pm. Tickets are $10 and are available by calling the store on (07) 3899 8555.

Here’s an excerpt from her long poem, Song for San Francisco.

*****

San Francisco

Your men hold their cameras like cocks
and your women cuckold
their overpriced waterfront shopping bags
each silk scarf a steal on Grant Avenue at a quarter
of the price made by the same
tiny brown hands

San Francisco

Your honest homeless men
spruiking change for weed or sex or alcohol
or their hundred dollar a day meth habit
Your homeless women absent
most likely sheltered together taking your
homeless men for every penny we provide

San Francisco

I came into your 20th Century history with eyes open
wanting simply to sit in Ferlinghetti’s chair contemplate
the feet that have walked these boards
read in this room
not knowing all the while that when I got here
I would take the photo like all the other tourists

San Francisco

You sell women from a specials board
today we have four girls
one Filipino, one Thai, one black and one white girl
she’s been on shift for a few hours already
… the others are hot, fresh and ready

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Countdown to SpeedPoets 10th Birthday Bash

This week is a big one… 

Tonight’s gig at Riverbend Books is almost sold out (a few tickets left so get there early!!!), tomorrow nights gig at Confit Bistro is being filmed for Channel 7’s The Great Southeast and then on Friday night I fly down to Melbourne to feature at The Castlemaine Poetry Reading (at The Guildford Hotel), hosted by Ross Donlon on Sunday, Feb 27.

Big times indeed…

And to add to that excitement, I am counting down the days until SpeedPoets celebrates its 10th birthday on Sunday March 6 at InSpire Gallery Bar (71 Vulture St. West End). SpeedPoets has kicked off the year by revamping their website and the first person to step on to the virtual stage is one of the 10th birthday features, our lovely lady from 4ZzZ’s Waxing Lyrical, Fern Thompsett. Head on over and check out our interview and read her poem Sunset on the Back Steps.

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Poetry Picks of 2010 – Jeremy Balius

Apples with Human Skin, Nathan Shepherdson (St. Lucia: University of Queensland Press, 2009)

No Australian poet has had a greater impact on my word-scribbles this year than Nathan Shepherdson. Apples with Human Skin was the catalyst.

This is a fierce book, a tesseract of tumult and brittle nettles, tagged and numbered and sent back out to pierce the forest floor.

See, understand this: Apples with Human Skin was my guidebook this year – a map for a Gieβen raised, Los Angeles educated, Berlin survived, Fremantle located cat.

In ‘einunzwanzig’ of the trakl (27×1) sequence (dedicated to Bruce Heiser, by the way), Nathan writes:

he had invented a blunt machine
for replacing umlauts in a poet’s brain

how to remember how to remember how to forget

Do you know the story of Austrian Expressionist poet Georg Trakl? Go look him up. This is important. Nathan’s book is named after Trakl’s ein Apfel mit menschlicher Haut.

To end, a snippet of ‘to find what is not there’, one of Nathan’s longer pieces in the volume.

so if you can see to the end of this sentence
you are either lying or you are blind

even the most basic words in repetition
make their own time one time in all time

 

 Indexical Elegies, Jon Paul Fiorentino (Toronto: Coach House Books, 2010)

The concept of beloved left-behinds being an index of those who’ve passed on is poignancy through and through.  Comprising three sequences, the title sequence of Indexical Elegies is in memoriam of Canadian Jon Paul Fiorentino’s late mentor Robert Allen.

It points to two aptly summarising epigraphs:

There is no truth
but in dead event, shaken, stunned

I miss everybody.
                                                – Gilbert Sorrentino

The index is physically connected with its object; they make an organic pair.

                                                – Charles Sanders Peirce

Deep into a Brisbane night, Jon Paul told me to get hooked on Sorrentino. I got hooked.

@JonPaul, icons bore me too. Am falling too far; weary. Upheaval. #chloroformedideas

Pay attention readers of the Lost Shark, when Jon Paul writes:

The word ‘I’ is apparently
an essential indexical unit

I hate
this

I lost you in November
and if time isn’t subjective

it’s November again and I am
appalled I grieve

Time is subjunctive
I am your index now

…I inhale that ish because I’ve lived that. I still live that. I inhale it and exhale only the ink.

High wit and dark humour oscillate despair, fury, loneliness, sadness and clang the drainpipes of Fiorentino’s hometowns of Winnipeg and Montreal. Sometimes it’s the smile hiding the clenched jaw. Sometimes it’s the flurry of word movement distracting from the bleary-eyed sleep deprivation.

Actually, scratch all that glib; forget everything in my note thus far.

Remember only this: Indexical Elegies is profound. I am deeply moved.

 

 im toten winkel des goldenen schnitts, Marcus Roloff (Frankfurt am Main: Gutleut Verlag, 2010)

I hadn’t had much to do with German poetics since regal 8 // shelf 8 was inducted into the Deutsches Literaturarchiv. Thankfully Marcus Roloff had a hand in making it an obsession again.

I met Marcus through Black Rider Press when we translated some of his work for The Diamond & the Thief. We later translated more of his work for Berlin’s no man’s land, partner to the infamous lauter niemand magazine. And we’ve got more we’re sitting on.

im toten winkel des goldenen schnitts (this roughly means in the blind spot of the golden ratio – if you don’t catch the various references and entendres in that, I’m not going to tell you) just came out recently and it’s the linguistic cartography, both of physical and metaphysical, that amazes. And also the typography – this book feels alive with its cover that folds out to reveal the entirety of the watercolour painting Dead Philosophers by Trevor Gould.

Marcus’ bio isn’t even in the book; it’s hidden on the back of the cover’s painting. I didn’t even notice it for ages. This aptly summarises his approach.

Marcus writes the way I’d imagine Pantha du Prince songs circa 2004 would read if all the notes were words. I see Marcus as the kind of poet who went out into the desert and came back to the city of Frankfurt am Main with a more expansive Truth and a de-centred self, clandestine urban operettas and a big ole bassline.

This is historiography for the deep-house kids. This is philosophy for the hopeful and bright-eyed kids. This is what it is for the introspective and fearless kids.

my gleiwitz

the long holidays beforehand & now / the neither-nor-
light at six a.m. // on the 1st of september a night-
shirt all tangled up / a nightmare jammed in the folds
of the cushion // from the cabinet a tumbling swift
or rather a jump / (a re-pre-metaphor) like the dusk under
the bedcover // & behind the window of the children’s room
the heimat of school full of empty idols and water
pistols / begins on the day of the attack on Poland //

(first published in no man’s land, issue 5)

 

 

 Jeremy Balius looks after Black Rider Press and hangs out with the Cottonmouth kids. You can find him at Am I the Black Rider? Yes. He writes for the last of the red hot lovers.

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Speak Out: Poetry and the Spoken Word (part 3) an interview with alicia sometimes

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with the Dr. Seuss lovin’ Tim Sinclair about all things Spoken Word. This interview with alicia sometimes continues to dig deep into the world of the spoken word, the opportunities for publication that exist and the art of performance. Questions by Clint Creagan.

alicia-sometimes

Some people have suggested that the term ‘spoken word’ is used by those  who are afraid or ashamed to call the work ‘poetry’. What are your  thoughts on this? 

Spoken word is a term that is used because it encompasses far more than just poetry. Poetry is often literature in a metrical form, usually verse. There are endless definitions and types of poetry just as there are many descriptions and forms of spoken word. Spoken word is spoken. Not sung or in print form. Spoken word can be just the sound of a repetitive voice, a speech, a rant, a monologue, a dialogue, a scream or text fused with music, sound or samples. I would call any poem read aloud as spoken word but it is usually a term that is referred to when the piece is completely off the page – performed, rehearsed and experimented with sound (especially voice).

Spoken word is not just a cool word for poetry. Neither term gets the movie going public to stop what they’re doing.

 

What opportunities are out there for spoken word artists to have their  work published? 

The best opportunity is under their noses. It is so cheap and easy to record your own work today. Recording studios are not thousands of dollars any more and it is both accessible and necessary to record your own work: to become producer, musician, work in collaboration and get your pieces out there. Many bands do it, so should spoken word artists. Spoken word pieces have had top 40 hits. If you can’t name them it’s because they didn’t market it that way – it’s called hip hop, rap or simply not given a name. Websites are great for promotion also.

Many performers will go from performing their work at many poetry readings to having their own shows. Again, the term ‘spoken word’ is often left out – most will call it a play, monologue, cabaret, performance etc…
 

Do you think we will see more opportunities for the publication of  performance poetry in the future? 

Yes, because artists won’t rely on the journals, magazines or anthologies to come up with an idea, they’ll do it themselves.
 

You have performed your work and been published many times. Do you think  your performances and your published work have complimented each other?  

In many cases the work is completely different. I started out performing spoken word with musicians (playing bass and speaking is kinda hard to do but it was fun). I did that for 5 years before I even attempted ‘reading’ my work. I am more interested in being published for the page than I was back then. I like the challenge and the difference. With print I have the chance to change and edit, on stage it’s more of a instant buzz or an instant death. Both compliment each other because my performance work is often very different in style and content than my print poetry. I get to have different depths.
 

Do you consider that some of your own poems are written specifically  for performance and would therefore not work for the page, and vice versa?

Some poems wouldn’t work on page because they are meant to be spoken – by using gesture, pauses, subtlety, timing, immediacy, feedback etc Some wouldn’t work on stage because they rely on texture, visual cues, word plays etc. Others work for both. I like the fact that words can be that different.
 

What makes a good performance poem? 

Communication with audience. Learning the work. Thinking about the piece and understanding it the way an actor would with words from a play. Sincerity (even with humour). Confidence.

 

Can a good performance draw attention away from bad writing? 

Yes but if it takes attention away from bad writing then perhaps it could be a great performance piece. What is bad writing? If someone gets up on stage and says a very simple sentence like ‘My underpants are on fire’ (hardly Shakespeare) and receives giddy applause then what makes it bad? If the way the performer expresses themselves is in context, humorous or meaningful etc then it can be fantastic entertainment. Is it a poem? Maybe not, but who cares? Poetry critics? If it was spoken, it’s spoken word. Is it genius? Well, if it made you smile, cringe, think etc, maybe. Crap writing plus crap performance equals bad audience reaction. Crap writing on the page is naked and so is a performer standing in front of an audience in front of a mike. The audience will tell them soon enough. If they’re listening.

Nothing kills great writing faster than it being performed in a horrible, dull or bland way. This is because the author is not thinking about the medium that they’re using. I’ve seen it happen with amazing writers. You’ll lose people.

 

What do you see as the benefits of performing your own work? 

Immediate feedback, chance to enhance the work, a chance to have fun. I love performing, don’t have to wait until the piece is ‘published’.
 

As a previous editor of Going Down Swinging you have had a first hand account of what it takes to record and publish spoken poetry. What difficulties did you find in this process? What are the benefits? 

With other people’s work the difficulties are actually getting the performers from out of their hiding places. Once in the studio, most writers are amazing: in their originality, creative drive, experimentation and enthusiasm. They are often surprised at the endless ways of layering their work and creating full pieces.

When authors submit their own work often their pieces are badly recorded (you’d never hand in a poem on dog eaten pages) or are simple ‘dry’ readings which can (not always of course) sound average and uninteresting. You can tell they’ve never listened to other recordings. The hardest problem though, at first, was actually receiving the work .

 

Some people have suggested that much of the performance poetry we see  today, tends toward what stand up comedians are attempting, which relies on timing and wit, but is one dimensional in its range. What are your thoughts on this? 

Again, I think that poetry at ‘readings’ MUST be entertaining. Poetry/spoken word doesn’t have to be loud or hammed up or bedded with music but it must be interesting. Too many poets forget their audiences, it is a different medium to the page. Not better or worse or one dimensional. Just think of the times you have been most impressed, involved or entertained at a poetry reading – it is often because the performer was funny, insightful, unique, engaging etc (even controversial). Are people that afraid to laugh?

 

About alicia:

alicia sometimes is a Melbourne poet/writer/musician. She is co-host of 3RRR’s spoken word and books show, Aural Text, and has performed at many festivals and venues both locally and internationally. She has also performed in front of fish, on a tram, across the Nullarbor, with a stuffed horse and on ABC TV’s Sunday Arts. She was co-editor of Going Down Swinging for six years. Her first book is kissing the curve (FIP)

 

Find out more:

http://www.aliciasometimes.com/
http://www.myspace.com/aliciasometimes

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Jumping the Poetic Hurdle (part 5) – an interview with Lyn Reeves

The final interview in the series with small publishers is with Lyn Reeves from Pardalote Press. There will be future interviews with online publishers, but for now, let’s see what Lyn has to say about the current state of poetry publishing and distribution in Australia.

 

As a small press publisher, what do you see are the major challenges for the publication and distribution of poetry in 21st century?

Recently I attended the Publishers’ Market run by Australian Poetry Centre at Glenfern. An informal forum, ‘Is Poetry Worth Publishing’ identified marketing and distribution as the main problems faced by small press publishers. Another area we discussed was the difficulty of getting our books reviewed in major newspapers and journals. However, we didn’t come up with any real answers.

Other major challenges are lack of resources – time, staff and money. Most poetry presses are run by poets, simply for the love of doing it. These poets have to find time for their own writing, and the tension of balancing both pursuits is not easy to resolve.

It’s not inexpensive to produce books, and if sales aren’t returning the outlay and bringing in enough to keep the press afloat, it will fold. Print runs are usually small, which increases the cost per unit. Booksellers and distributors take up to 70% of the RRP; the royalty to the author is another 10%. This doesn’t leave much for the publisher once printing and design costs are met. Direct marketing is the most efficient way to sell, and to avoid the books languishing in bookshops, becoming shop-soiled and unsaleable. Pardalote Press has been fortunate in receiving a number of grants, donations and sponsorships to produce its books and enable it to keep going, but it isn’t a profit-making venture.

The most challenging area for Pardalote, as for many other small presses, is promotion. I run the press alone, facilitating all aspects of proofreading, design and printing. These are the things I enjoy and can do well, but marketing is not one of my skills. Though I’ve tried a range of approaches to getting the word out – website, media releases and review copies, launches, emails, mail-outs, distributors, advertising – I’ve found that the most successful way to sell is through the authors themselves. When authors are active in giving workshops and readings and promoting their books in other ways, they usually manage to sell a good number of their books. Hopefully SPUNC (Small Press Underground Networking Community) will help address some of the difficulties in promoting to a wider audience than small presses can afford to reach on their own.

 

Why is poetry, an art that arguably best reflects the speed at which we absorb ideas, information and imagery, is being neglected by corporate publishing houses and distributors throughout Australia?

It’s a reflection of the fact that poetry isn’t a money-earner and the corporate publishing houses are interested in the bottom line. Poetry doesn’t have a high profile in our society. There are the well-known Australian names like Les Murray and Dorothy Porter but the main audience for poetry is other poets. Poetry is considered an esoteric and fringe activity by mainstream culture. The general public would rather buy books on sport or gardening or biographies of celebrities or, when it comes to literature, books by writers they’ve heard of. Even when some boutique bookshops stock poetry they rarely take more than a few copies, and these are usually hidden at the back of the shop somewhere out of sight.

‘Reader Education’ can help overcome some of this resistance, and there’s often talk about how to do this, but it does need effort, funding and coordination to be effective. I’ve found that when, as a poet, I’ve been involved in taking readings to new audiences outside the literary community, people are generally very positive about poetry.

Small presses have arisen in response to the decline in interest by the corporate publishers, to meet the need for poets’ voices to be heard and read. I doubt if any of them actually make money out publishing, but that’s not the point of it, though it would be nice.

My own experience with using a national distributor wasn’t successful, so I’ve set up a shopping cart on my website. I still rely on the poets to let people know their work is available, and to personally sell and promote their books. Pardalote also hosts books by a number of other Tasmanian poets on its site.

 

Do you see a light at the end of the tunnel? What is the future of poetry publishing and distribution?

That does seem like a pretty bleak picture but people will go on writing and reading poetry, so there will always be the need to share their words abroad.

I don’t think of it as being inside a dark tunnel. I think you have to accept your limitations as a small press, the appeal of poetry to a large market, and work within those parameters. It’s more like being in a field adjacent to the bigger marketplace, but that field is full of the light of many voices, the joy of creativity, both in the writing of poems and the making and sharing of books. The rewards are in the doing. It would be nice to reach bigger audiences; as communicators we all want that. So we go on trying different approaches. And we do need to break even so that we can keep on producing the books.

Electronic delivery of poetry will play a greater role in publishing and distribution. There are more and more journals going online. Though it’s been slow to catch on, the e-book seems to be gaining more acceptance. The problem seems to be how to pay for the product, but in digital format it’s less expensive to produce. The internet will certainly play a role in making poetry more available, but the printed book won’t be ousted altogether. There’s something about the intimacy of poetry that harmonises with the tactile pleasure of a lovingly made book. We spend so much time in front of screens, it’s good to relax and get comfortable with a book. There’s less distraction and for me it’s a more focussed way to engage with the writing.

 

What is on the horizon for Pardalote?

Pardalote Press has been publishing poetry for a little over eight years now, beginning with a chapbook by Eric Beach, Red Heart, My Country. Initially I set out only to produce chapbooks, something affordable that could be sold at readings, but soon the lure of ‘the book’, beautifully designed and presented, took hold and I’ve continued to strive for a high standard in production values, as well as content, in the fourteen titles that make up the Pardalote list to date.

The most recent collection is Postcards from the Asylum by Karen Knight. The manuscript won the Alec Bolton Award in 2007 and is a powerful book. Reviews to date have been consistently stunning.

At the moment I’m editing a new collection of translations by Ian Johnston of ancient Chinese poetry, a sequel to Singing of Scented Grass, which has been my most successful book so far. The poems in Waiting for the Owl are taken from an earlier period, mostly from the Han Dynasty. That should be available some time later this year.

Because I work alone I can only do one manuscript a year, though there have been times when I’ve done two or three. I’d like to do more. I’ve had to send back some wonderful manuscripts by very fine poets that I would have loved to publish, and sometimes had to disappoint people I’ve had a tentative arrangement with, because life events made it necessary for me to cut back on how much publishing I could do. I try not to plan too far ahead. There’s another collection under way that may come out before or after the Chinese poems. But I’m also working on finalising a manuscript of my own that a publisher has offered to take up, and I’m doing some postgraduate study. It’s important to find time for my own poetry this year. At the moment I can’t accept any new submissions.

As well as producing these collections I need to empty my cupboards by selling more of the books that remain in unopened boxes, to make more room and bring in some funds to help with making more books. I wish for a marketing person, committed to poetry and willing to work for virtually no financial reward. Although I use a distributor in Tasmania, poetry really needs passionate representation that distributors don’t give it.

I often think it would be good to work with a small team of people with a mix of skills. That way we could get more poetry books out there, and there’s no shortage of worthwhile manuscripts to choose from. I’m also interested in the idea of e-books, especially for those titles that are out of print. Learning how to do that will be a whole new journey.

 

About Lyn:

Lyn Reeves is a poet, editor, managing director of Pardalote Press and an associate editor of the literary journal, Famous Reporter. She has collaborated with painters, print-makers, musicians, photographers, workers and scientists for various poetry events. Awards include grants from Arts Tasmania and the Australia Council, and residencies at Varuna, St. Helens, and Darwin. Lyn has been a featured reader at many festivals, including the Queensland Poetry Festival, Sydney Writers’ Festival, Word Storm, The Tasmanian Poetry Festivals, and at other venues in Tasmania and interstate. A collection of her haiku, Walking the Tideline, appeared in December 2001. Her poetry collection Speaking with Ghosts was published by Ginninderra Press in 2002. More recently, she has published two chapbooks, Beads (Picaro Press, 2007) and the ink brushed distance (Walleah Press, 2008). She is one of four poets whose work appears in the award-winning anthology Seasoned with Honey (Walleah Press, 2008).

Find out more:

http://www.pardalote.com.au
http://www.the-write-stuff.com.au/archives/vol-7/lyn_reeves/index.html
http://www.pardalote.com.au/authors/reevesl/
http://www.styluspoetryjournal.com/main/master.asp?id=395

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