Monthly Archives: May 2009

Burroughs vs Kathy Acker

shotgun burroughs

 

Well it’s Sunday morning … so get that coffee brewing, fill your cup and settle in for a while. This interview from the late 80’s is something else. Burroughs is exhibiting his shotgun art in London and is publishing some of the best work of his career (Cities of Red Night, The Western Lands & Place of Dead Roads). He is as dry and witty as ever and Acker’s questions lead to some truly illuminating moments between these two literary outlaws.

So here it is…

Shotgun and Paintbrush: Kathy Acker talks to William Burroughs.

And for those who want to check out another interview with Burroughs drawing comparisons between his shotgun art and the cut-up technique you should check this out at Leary and Burroughs.

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The ongoing question of Literary Value

Thank you to those who left a comment on the recent blog post ‘Self Publishing & Literary Value’. I would still love many more of you to weigh in on the debate and share your response to the question, ‘What is literary value?’

This question has been running around my head for the last few days so when snooping around some of my favourite blogs today, I discovered this great post, from Adam Fieled over at Stoning the Devil. The post titled On Snobbery struck me as a great response to the question I had posed, so I just had to share. Enjoy…

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Another Killer Opportunity – QPF Filmmakers Challenge

QPF Logo

 

CALLING ALL FILMMAKERS!!! 

Entries are open for the QPF Filmmakers Challenge, 2009!

The Queensland Poetry Festival challenges Australian filmmakers, video artists and other multimedia practitioners to produce a short work (5 minutes max) which explores the possibilities of poetic expression via audio visual technology.

Your work might be a record of a poetry performance, a video text manipulation or something entirely different. They are looking for work that displays creativity, originality and an understanding of the possibilities of language.

A prize of $500 is up for grabs and the winner will be announced at the 2009 Queensland Poetry Festival (21-23 August, 2009). A selection of entries will also be screened at the Poetry on the Big Screen session at QPF 2009.

The deadline for entries is Friday 17 July 2009. Download the entry form in the Competitions section of www.queenslandpoetryfestival.com

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Self-publishing & Literary Value

I was recently over at the Overland blog and found some really interesting discussion taking place in response to the ‘open letter from Salt publishing’. It was interesting that as part of this discussion, the topic of self-publishing was raised and it’s worth debated.

The self-publishing debate is one that has been raging for many years …

So, here’s a couple of links that I have unearthed that provide some interesting reading on the topic of self-publishing.

First up an article from The Washington Times – Self-publishing finds commercial niche in digital age

And this article from the Self-Publishing Review – What is Literary Value?

The question, ‘What is literary value’, is something that I would love people to respond to, as I think it is a question that needs more open discussion.

Look forward to hearing your thoughts …

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Guided by Poets – Victoria

This Guided by Poets thread showcases the voices of five mighty fine Victorian writers.

I gave the enigmatic Maurice McNamara a call to start the thread and the rest…

So here it is, Guided by Poets (Victoria), featuring poems by Maurice McNamara, Joe De Iacovo, Angela Costi, Jen Jewel Brown & Andy Jackson.

 

Maurice McNamara

Maurice McNamara

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

pork

I’ve got fat since I found true lady love
and she’s got a bit fat too
Maurice, I’ll do anything for you
and usually it involves pork

I sit on the couch reading true crime novels
whilst she gets on with making a living
editing
it sounds like good money
but it makes her cranky
fixing up crap someone else wrote

I get on the computer after she’s gone to bed
and write things to other poets
sometimes in other countries
with headphones on
that I don’t want to read next morning
because drink declares
you’re stupid

we argue on Fridays
when we get back together again
are you listening to me darling?
she’s worrying about the cat
we eat at occasional tables found in a garage sale
sometimes she cooks and sometimes I do

by Saturday morning we’ve got the weekend
I bring her breakfast
who goes to the toilet first?
and then shower
she takes an hour to primp her hair

when I’ve evacuated my bowels
and drunk coffee, I’m almost human
sometimes we just sit around and do word play
we go to Footscray and eat Vietnamese soup
some days we go to the country

in a good relationship
you just run across perfect moments
because the universe loves a lover

but she complains
if I take her down factory roads
where, too often, I like to go
but usually we find a cat, a goat
a rare weed, a flower
a smell
something built in iron we take home

our love doesn’t depend on agreeing
we leave our strangeness strictly alone
we’re at that time of life when we can point out houses we lived in
but we don’t want to live in those houses anymore
I laugh at her in that strange hat
she laughs at me trying to climb the hill
but she’s close to my hand
when I slip down

 

About Maurice:

Maurice McNamara’s debut collection Half-Hour Country is due to be released in 2009 through Small Change Press. He has been involved with Melbourne spoken word scene for a number of years, and now that his children are almost grown up, can devote himself to the sunny uplands of ART.

 

 

 

 
Dismantling a flockhouse

(for Mars)
My brother said
                                that machine
is older than you and me
put together.
                    Textile plants offer the cleanest
ending
                    with off-cuts,
spools still half-wound with cloth,
clusters of lint hovering in corners
as if they’re moths
caught in an eddy.
                  First, cut along the weld,
just here,
                  then the rest of the flockhouse
comes apart in stages.
                 All of these machines
are going off-shore:
to China, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka,
                 my brother said,
leaning over
doubling at the belly
measuring how a mixer’s
shaft is to be unbolted.
                 On the bonding oven’s guards
and long flat panels:
                                defunct roster sheets,
                  faded stickers:
                                -Wipe your hands first-,
a Carn the ‘Roys poster

of a lion holding a bomb-like ball
between its teeth
wearing tight shorts
and a Guernsey of maroon
royal blue and gold.
                    Tattslotto syndicate charts
plotted with crosses of loss
and a few prized ticks
shared-out on Wednesdays.
The names on safety gloves
and dustcoats:
                     Donzo,
                                   Clem, and Toni with an i-
did women work here too?
There are only men helping us
dismember this place they’ve
                     worked in for
longer than you and me put together
my brother said
                     the women were laid off first
                     he said
some blokes decided to stay
on and help us
                     because most of  ‘em won’t
find work again.
In the mornings
                     they nodded their heads at us
                     just enough
to register a ‘Hey’,
                                     ‘Hello’,
                     and on the day
we closed the plant for good
one man said:
                                     ‘Here we are again.’

 

(first appeared in Verandah, vol. 17, 2002)

 

About Joe:

Joe De Iacovo’s writing/poems have appeared in Meanjin, Southerly, Verandah, and others. He currently works as a counsellor.

 

 

Angela Costi

Angela Costi

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Sheep One

They found her swivelled in her lover’s arms,
instantly branded, seared with the hottest tongues
still she swirled deeper, became the second flavour
in the soft serve cone and Andreas became the first.

Her husband was informed while tying up his dinghy,
his hands flew up as if to catch those bad words,
the rope uncoiled and snaked into the sea, he fell in
with his shoes, coat, memories, grappled with the water
he couldn’t drown her green kitten eyes, her splash
of freckles in the indigo light made her look younger
no where near as young as Andreas,
his barber, her lover, his sons’ barber, her lover
his neighbour, her lover, his friend.

She wore her guilt like underwear,
only with Andreas it slipped off, tossed at the doorway,
was sunk in her pheromone’s spell.
Guilt became her second coat worn on the hottest days
when her husband drenched in sea and sorrow
couldn’t speak without a fist fixing into a wall,
her oldest boy tried to split himself in two,
her youngest went missing, found blue-kneed at the dock,
she knotted her apron twice, fought only with grease,
stains, dust and longing, found her sons another barber.

Andreas couldn’t sleep without her nose butting his neck,
if only it was just the bed where he ached for her,
he couldn’t open cupboards, read books, watch clouds,
he couldn’t cut her style into the shape of others,
her wayward curls were unrepeatable,
he saw his future as a cracked vase with a dried rose.

He tiptoed back to her with a wave across a busy street,
a smile, the freshest longest red rose, a card, a letter,
love written, love touched, love held.
She turned back to ice-cream melt,
clenched her fist against her heart and said,
Tomorrow is only possible with Andreas.

 

About Angela:

Angela Costi is the author of three collections of poetry: Dinted Halos (chapbook, Hit&Miss Publications, 2003), Prayers for the Wicked (CD, Floodtide Audio, 2005) and Honey and Salt (Five Islands Press, 2007). Honey and Salt was shortlisted for the Mary Gilmore Prize 2008. Her poems, performance text, essays and stories have been widely published, broadcast and produced, including in the US, UK, Greece and across Australia (for example: Sojourner Boston, wanderingdog UK, LiNQ and Radio National-ABC).

 

 

Jen Jewel Brown

Jen Jewel Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Medusa lead rascalation

I turn on the tv
and there you are
with your guitar slunched into the solo
lathering and turbulating
growling, humming and hubbubing
moa-ning and rascalating
o that thrumming low drung rumble
of your Medusa lead

come closer you
leaning out of the set
to blow your lava crack chick
stack between my feet, bang!
bright spark tangent innocent
reaching down, this thuddering live
rubble crack below
like this massive channel
of vibrating
sex soul synchrome twister wrench
energy opens me up

you right through from the magma
reaching from the hot rock at the centre
of the world right through
to the stratosphere
connecting eerily and endlessly
to you through you to you

now I’m a through-way
a thoroughfare
my fingers radiating
snakes of fire
a lit-up pinball douce machina
paying out in spades, in tangos
bang bang bang ding ding ding
in pepper-tongued blades of words

 

About Jen:

Jen Jewel Brown is a widely published writer across many genres. Her story on familicide and Family Law, Suffer the little children, was featured in The Age on May 3 2009. She is an activist and single mother who likes to see what poetry can stretch to. She prefers to dance with her demons rather than wrestle them, or better still, matchmake them with her angels and get away free. On the brag front, Jen was the winner of the Greater Dandenong Writing Awards Open Poetry Prize 2006, Spinning Room (Melbourne) female ‘call-back’ poet of 2005 and Victorian Writers’ Centre Poetry Cup Best Performer in 2004. She’s also the author of Skyhooks’ Million Dollar Riff  and poetry books Marsupial Wrestling (Outback Press), Alleycat (Feral Books) and gutter vs stars (Flat Chat Press). Her work has been widely anthologised. She is currently working on two new poetry books and other projects. She blogs at: http://flaminghoop.blogspot.com/

 

Andy Jackson

Andy Jackson

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Strange friendship
                   for Norman

The trick has become this – how to pull the thumb out
of the dam and not drown.  Here on the couch, our legs
face in the same direction, our thighs almost touch.

The clinking of pool-balls is an ambient sound,
the crack and sigh of another crude attempt. 
I want to tell you how strange this friendship seems,

to ask you where your grief is, as if in your composure
you are being dishonest, but I fear this might be
the stone thrown into the clear face we’ve made. 

Perhaps this poem will ensure it’s sufficiently obscure. 
Or, in a public place, where a certain absence
of intimacy’s the done thing, here’s an album you might like

and half an answer to a cryptic clue.  Is it funny
when they speak of themselves in the third person
or safe, a way to pull back as they begin to shrink

into the other?  Mateship can be a collusion
or a way out.  You arrived and the line where I end
became slightly more blurred.  Who’s to say

it’s not all a miraculous accident of cause and effect?
Miles away, wave after wave breaks against the beach.
And I speak as if the pulse of blood in us

will not be stopped by any blade or disease,
that these bodies which breathe the same air are enough,
that consciousness is no more problematic than its lack. 

I reckon I’ll get another.  You want one?

 

About Andy:

Andy Jackson has been published in a wide variety of print and on-line journals; received grants from the Australia Council and Arts Victoria, and a mentorship from the Australian Society of Authors; and featured at events and festivals such as Australian Poetry Festival, Queensland Poetry Festival, Newcastle Young Writers Festival and Overload Poetry Festival.  Most recently, he was awarded the Rosemary Dobson Prize for Poetry, and will be a Café Poet in Residence for the Australian Poetry Centre.  His most recent collection of poems, Among the Regulars, is scheduled for release by papertiger media later in 2009.

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A quick chat with Marisa Allen (Bremen Town Musician)

Marisa Allen (Bremen Town Musician) is feature musician and poet and the next SpeedPoets event (2pm Sunday, June 7 @ The Alibi Room, 720 Brunswick St. New Farm) as well as one of the features at the final Riverbend Books, Poetry on the Deck event on Tuesday June 23 (click here for details).

 

marisa allen

 

We caught up recently and hade a quick chat…

 

What initially drew you to poetry?

I read constantly and writing was something that I had always done and I think the first thing I wrote was a poem when I was in year six and it just followed on from that. Later on I really started writing poetry as a means to explore song writing. I began writing poems as a stepping stone to that and just filtered out which ones were better as poems and which ones were better as songs. Poetry allows me to make sense of the world around me and to express myself.

 

When is a poem ready to be published/performed?

I don’t have a strict sense of readiness for a piece of writing, instinctively I know when a poem works or not. It’s ready when it’s ready and I don’t labour too much on it. Usually there is a strong voice or atmosphere to the words that let me know if a piece is suitable to be published or performed, but it’s such an unknown based on how I feel subjectively about a piece. I always say I have no ugly children, meaning I love them all equally and most I would like to put out into the public sphere. Obviously there are better poems than others, but I just write them, I don’t judge them!  Although I do like to let them sit for a while and go back to them after maybe a year and make small changes to phrases and really make sure what I’m wanting to express is clear.

 

Has publication changed the way you approach your writing?

Yes. In a way it makes me a little more self conscious but it also emboldens me to push a little harder. Poems that are published are usually chosen because they are ready to be published but once that happens you let them go, they no longer are yours and sometimes I find going back to them to be tiresome, as it’s like yes this was good then when it was written but how can I better it now, how can I move from it to something that is relevant to the experiences I am having now.

 

Why perform/read your poetry?

I have no idea! I think this is a complex question… I am acutely aware of poetry that works out loud or as a spoken performance piece and poetry that is meant to be read in silence in your mind. I’m really interested in this contrast. At this point I read my poetry because there is a voice in it that I can hear; it brings it to life and adds dimension to the words. But there are certainly poems that I don’t feel have the immediacy to be read out loud, that maybe are very complex in imagery and need a different approach, such as the quiet of reading alone, reading a phrase over and over to grasp the meaning.

 

What is the greatest challenge faced by poets/poetry today?

Well I think there is always a food shortage just round the corner in any poets life! I think it is the same for any artist, getting their work heard, published, viewed, getting feedback, support in the process which is the most murky area because usually a poet or artist is constantly in a  creative process. Also creating opportunities for poets to have some value in society outside the creative and subjective world of their own writing. I think this is immensely important, that an artist should be able to connect with the world that doesn’t always support their own vision but still values the poet anyway by creating opportunities to use their skills outside of purely creative pursuits. I think the competitiveness and nepotism of any creative area can be very off putting and it’s a challenge that is unnecessary for a creative person to have to face. I think we need a completely new approach to how selection and standardization across the arts is decided, judged on artistic sensibility and merit as opposed to bureaucratic or financial standards, unfortunately it does take time for people to take your work seriously and that in itself is a challenge on a day to day basis.

 

 

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A poem is a naked person… (Bob Dylan)

A poem is a naked person… Some people say I’m a poet.

                                                                                            Bob Dylan

 

dylan_pic

 

It is impossible to overstate the significance of Bob Dylan. As Springsteen so elegantly put it, ‘Dylan freed the mind, the way Elvis freed the body.’

Today the great man turns 68 and there is no sign of slowing down. His 33rd studio album, ‘Together Through Life’ recently hit number 1 in both the US and the UK and he has embarked on yet another leg of the Neverending Tour with Willie Nelson and John Mellencamp.

If you haven’t had your Bob-fix today, do yourself a favour and have a look at these clips… the man has still got the fire, just check out the 2009 live performance of Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat.

Happy birthday Bob,

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gq-JzMeixU

(Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat – live 2009)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDaPjYPyyGU&feature=related

(Cold Irons Bound – from the limited edition Modern Times DVD)

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Guided by (Riverbend) Poets

Yes, the final Poetry on the Deck event at Riverbend Books is fast approaching. The final event for 2009 will launch the QLD Poetry Festival programme by showcasing five of the local poets performing at this years festival. And believe me, it is an exciting program!

Here’s a sample of what you are in for… a poem from each of the Riverbend poets.

 

Angel Kosch

Angel Kosch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Rose Crows

 

The murder of crows in the rose garden
Are eyeing me off
With their ruffled feathers and
Beady eyes.

Sitting on fences, waddling on lawns
Gawky messengers
Dark as velvet
Sleek
Sly.

A murder of crows haunting the rose garden
Sitting sleekly on fences
Cawing at benches
Manning the battlements of old cement paths through
Yesterdays thorn flowers.

Old as a rhyme
Hoarse as a head jaunt
Sharpened beak poised to the light
that glints in their eyes.

The murder of crows in the rose garden
Are eyeing me off
With their ruffled feathers
And steely goodbye.

 

 

Nicola Scholes

Nicola Scholes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gymnasia

Step II: Learn

 

I could be sweating in a pleated
sports skirt, way too short for sticky
summer days, when one was seated

like an egg on the mould
of a cheap chair, that one wetted
like glue on an envelope’s fold

until sealed to plastic.  How I
hated that moment when—forced
to peel, rise to feet—I tried

not to notice the damp residue
that dissolved like the screen
of your gran’s TV.  Do you

remember the eyes of the boys
behind—how they burned into
your cheeks?

 

 

Jeffrey Harpeng

Jeffrey Harpeng

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marked

 
arms blue with prison tatts
on his shoulder a spider
stuck in its own web

After the bank robbery he went bush, roustabout and shearer. One job
he lived in a tin shed an hour from town. Didn’t drink with the crew
in town. Shouldered slabs of tinnies and a bottle of whiskey back. Just
in the door a termite floorboard cracked and he fell into. . . couldn’t
budge. So he drank a shout to himself and himself and himself.

The sun snailed twice across the sky. And the kookaburras laughed,
even at the brown snake that basked at the door…

Mid-fifties, he keeps his hair long, to flip in case he meets an old
screw.

 

 

Zenobia Frost

Zenobia Frost

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the Ferry, Looking Out

 
What bonds must hold these atoms’ hands
that I stand so collected,
like stamps or butterflies?
I can see my yesterdays
scattered across this river, and wonder whether
you could piece me together in different ways
by asking the inconstant water
how she would build me.
Watching twilight
shatter into street lights –
deep blue turns fog
into romance – I am looking
to complete my collection,
and I keep coming back
to Brisbane.

 

 

Marisa Allen

Marisa Allen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little Bird, A Singing Bird

 

Little bird
A singing bird
The lark of all I have
I’ll take you all
Into the dusk
The wilderness and desert
I’ll bring you home
I’ll let you know
The strength
This heart contains
When the bitter winds come
And all is done
I will remain
Little bird
A singing bird
The lark of all I have

 

 

Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present Poetry on the Deck.

Date: Tuesday 23 June
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at www.riverbendbooks.com.au

The first two events this year have been hugely successful, so book early to avoid disappointment!

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The Value of Poetry Critique/Criticism

I have recently been checking out the 10 Questions posts on the blog Very Like A Whale.

I was particularly interested in the responses given when 10 poets were asked to comment on a passage from the article Why Poetry Criticism Sucks by Kristin Prevallet (first published in Jacket Magazine).

The passage reads:

It is very difficult to write poetry criticism and not have poets feel personally maimed […]. For some reason poetry criticism does not advance the formal, intellectual, or contextual parameters of poetry. It always gets confused with the personal.”

 

While I feel that poetry critque/criticism has become less rigorous and is used now more as a marketing tool, I cannot help but think that genuinely well written criticism; criticism that is thought out, crafted, researched, unbiased is vital for both the poet and poetry.

But that is just my humble opinion… I would love to hear from many of you to hear your thoughts.

I also recommend reading the responses to this passage on Very Like A Whale… some real food for thought. Read the responses here.

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QLD Poetry Festival Presents – Poetry on the Riverbend Deck

Queensland Poetry Festival, QLD Writers Centre & Riverbend Books are proud to present the final Poetry on the Deck event for 2009. Join us on the Riverbend deck as we showcase five of the local artists performing at the 2009 QLD Poetry Festival. This QPF showcase event features multi-skilled artist, Angel Kosch (Standing on the Road); winner of The Dream Ain’t Broken chapbook competition Nicola Scholes (Dear Rose); one of Australia’s finest exponents of the Japanese forms haibun and tanka, Jeffery Harpeng (Quarter Past Sometime); poetic adventurer and protector of apostrophes, Zenobia Frost (The Voyage); and experimental writer and musician, Marisa Allen (Fire in the Head).

Date: Tuesday 23 June
Location: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St. Bulimba
Time: Doors open for the event at 6pm for a 6:30pm start
Tickets: $10 available through Riverbend Books and include sushi and complimentary wine. To purchase tickets, call Riverbend Books on (07) 3899 8555 or book online at  www.riverbendbooks.com.au

The first two events this year have been hugely successful, so book early to avoid disappointment!

 

About the Poets:

 
Angel KoschAngel Kosch is a Brisbane based multi-skilled artist , currently a core member of Queensland Shakespeare Ensemble – appearing most recently with them as an actor and singer in Food of Love – a Shakespeare Cabaret . In 2002 she self-published a book of poetry, photography and fragments called ‘Standing on the Road – from old bit of paper’ which was recognised in the Queensland Writers Centre magazine ; Following the release of her collection She was interviewed for a thesis on self-publishing, and she has recently started to compile another collection of short stories, poetry and photography. Angel is a singer/songwriter and has been writing and singing since she was about 6. In 2005, she co- wrote and produced  a combined ep Humidity with Gene Miller and Moses Jones. As a visual Artist/photographer, Angel has had a number of solo exhibitions, the most recent being ‘tell me your secrets’ in November 2007. Angel has a long history of community work and social and environmental activism, and this passion for life imbues her driving force of artistic chaos.
 

 

Nicola Scholes

Nicola Scholes won the inaugural Small Change Press “Dream Ain’t Broken Chapbook Competition,” with her collection Dear Rose…, to be launched on July 5. She also won the inaugural Love Poetry Hate Racism open mic competition in 2007. Aside from winning inaugural things, Nicola has had her poems published in The Broadkill Review (USA), Colloquy, Cordite Poetry Review, The Courier-Mail, dotlit, Hecate, holland1945, The Mozzie, Nineteen-O-Splash (NZ), Poems in Perspex: Max Harris Poetry Award 2007, Ripples, Social Alternatives, SpeedPoets, and Stylus Poetry Journal. Her drawings and poems for children have appeared in Cherububble. Nicola has also been involved in Brisbane community theatre for more than ten years. She has performed in plays with Villanova Players, and St. Luke’s Theatre Society. She is currently studying a PhD on representations of the maternal in Allen Ginsberg’s poetry, at the University of Queensland.

 

Jeffrey Harpeng

Jeffrey Harpeng has recently had his third co-operative writing project, a tanka-prose sequence, published in  the Spring 2009 Modern English Tanka. Earlier co-compositions were Four Tellings – A Haibun Sequence, with Beverley George (Aus), and Owen Bullock, and Joanna Preston ( New Zealand ), and Quartet – A String of Haibun, with Patricia Prime ( New Zealand ), Diana Webb ( UK ) and Jeffrey Woodward ( USA ). He is currently completing a second collection of haibun.

 

Marisa Allen

Marisa Allen is a songwriter, musician and performer. Better known as the front woman for the band Bremen Town Musician she had her first book of contemporary poetry ‘Fire in the Head’ published in 2007 through Outsider press, edited by David ‘Ghostboy’ Stavanger. She has been published in Cottonmouth (Western Australia), Tsunami Street Press (Queensland), performed regularly at Outsiders poetry nights, QPF 2007 and has been a feature artist on 4ZZZ radio show ‘The Siren’s Call’ that showcases local women writers, songwriters, poets and musicians. She also had a stint editing local folk stories in Reykjavik, Iceland for guided tourist walks around the city. It seems she can’t stop writing, and always has her pencil sharpened, just in case.

 

 

Zen

Zenobia Frost is a poetic adventurer, hat fetishist and protector of apostrophes whose debut collection, The Voyage, was recently launched by SweetWater Press. In her writing, Zenobia aims to highlight those common enchantments that are often overlooked. Thus, The Voyage is a whimsical journey on (generally) calm seas with a crew of curious creatures and a compass that points to whichever shore offers the best cup of tea. Zenobia’s poems have found homes in such Australian journals as Going Down Swinging, Small Packages, Stylus, Mascara and Voiceworks, and she has recently performed at the Queensland Poetry Festival, Contraverse and Under a Daylight Moon.

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